Bourbaki's Axiom

curiosamathematica:

Finite Simple Group (of Order Two), by the Klein Four.

The path of love is never smooth
But mine’s continuous for you
You’re the upper bound in the chains of my heart
You’re my Axiom of Choice, you know it’s true

But lately our relation’s not so well-defined
And I just can’t function without you
I’ll prove my proposition and I’m sure you’ll find
We’re a finite simple group of order two

I’m losing my identity
I’m getting tensor every day
And without loss of generality
I will assume that you feel the same way

Since every time I see you, you just quotient out
The faithful image that I map into
But when we’re one-to-one you’ll see what I’m about
'Cause we're a finite simple group of order two

Our equivalence was stable
A principal love bundle sitting deep inside
But then you drove a wedge between our two-forms
Now everything is so complexified

When we first met, we simply connected
My heart was open but too dense
Our system was already directed
To have a finite limit, in some sense

I’m living in the kernel of a rank-one map
From my domain, its image looks so blue
'Cause all I see are zeroes, it's a cruel trap
But we’re a finite simple group of order two

I’m not the smoothest operator in my class
But we’re a mirror pair, me and you
So let’s apply forgetful functors to the past
And be a finite simple group, a finite simple group,
Let’s be a finite simple group of order two

I’ve proved my proposition now, as you can see
So let’s both be associative and free
And by corollary, this shows you and I to be
Purely inseparable. Q.E.D.

Why is the Australian Government planting Islamist cells in the Pacific and in South East Asia?

Indefinitely imprisoning innocent asylum seekers causes much harm. And for a small minority, it will result in radicalization and anti-Western tendencies.

The alternative would be to welcome them into the Australian community, and have them become our valued and productive fellow-citizens.

qagoma:

[Calling Harajuku Girls of Brisbane!] GOMA is seeking a group of enthusiastic Harajuku girls to be part of the coveted opening events for Future Beauty: 30 Years of Japanese Fashion in Brisbane on Fri 31 Oct / Successful applicants will receive a season pass for two to the ‘Future Beauty’ exhibition & Future Beauty Up Late events valued at $470 / Think you’ve got what it takes? / Get in touch by emailing your details to info@qagoma.qld.gov.au / Don’t forget to include a photo / Applications close Tue 30 Sep / Applicants must be 18 years or older

Lol, promoting something like this seems like a good use of tumblr.

qagoma:

[Calling Harajuku Girls of Brisbane!] GOMA is seeking a group of enthusiastic Harajuku girls to be part of the coveted opening events for Future Beauty: 30 Years of Japanese Fashion in Brisbane on Fri 31 Oct / Successful applicants will receive a season pass for two to the ‘Future Beauty’ exhibition & Future Beauty Up Late events valued at $470 / Think you’ve got what it takes? / Get in touch by emailing your details to info@qagoma.qld.gov.au / Don’t forget to include a photo / Applications close Tue 30 Sep / Applicants must be 18 years or older

Lol, promoting something like this seems like a good use of tumblr.

Snowden and the Mathematicians
In the June 2014 edition of the Notices of the AMS (the American Mathematical Society - a three-letter entity of less notoriety than the NSA!) two math professors provide contrasting responses to the Edward Snowden revelations of the NSA surveillance programs. They have previously worked as academics in either assisting the NSA, or more generally in the area of cryptography and security, but neither have been direct employees, nor held security clearances.
Dr Keith Devlin from Stanford University is probably best known to Americans at That Math Guy on NPR. He worked with the NSA post 9/11 on the NIMD project, and his main concern, apart from the betrayal of trust, is that the NSA data gathering severely weakens US security. He now feels forced to break ties with the NSA, and does not recommend the agency to his student for employment.
In contrast, Prof Andrew Odlyzko of the University of Minnesota, does still recommend the NSA to his students. Having misgivings, and urging some reforms, he sees the agency as important for protecting US interests and global information systems. A major line of his argument is that it is inevitable that privacy is being eroded, and hence it is better that the NSA be ahead of others.
Despite his guarded support to the NSA, Odlyzko raises some of the more critical opinions:
"My carefully considered view is that our society has become preoccupied with terrorism to an absurd and harmful degree. That is what has driven the intelligence agencies to the extreme measures they have taken."
"The moves taken in the name of fighting terrorism, including the intrusive NSA data collection that has recently come to light and more generally the militarization of our society, are not justified by the dangers we currently face from terrorism. In fact, these moves will likely inhibit our ability to deal with many of the other threats and probably will even inhibit the antiterrorism campaign."
As Western politicians use IS extremism as the latest excuse for another round of drastic reductions to our liberties and increased powers to intelligence agencies, it is worth considering these thoughtful critiques of accepting politicians’ knee-jerk and unbalanced measures.

Snowden and the Mathematicians

In the June 2014 edition of the Notices of the AMS (the American Mathematical Society - a three-letter entity of less notoriety than the NSA!) two math professors provide contrasting responses to the Edward Snowden revelations of the NSA surveillance programs. They have previously worked as academics in either assisting the NSA, or more generally in the area of cryptography and security, but neither have been direct employees, nor held security clearances.

Dr Keith Devlin from Stanford University is probably best known to Americans at That Math Guy on NPR. He worked with the NSA post 9/11 on the NIMD project, and his main concern, apart from the betrayal of trust, is that the NSA data gathering severely weakens US security. He now feels forced to break ties with the NSA, and does not recommend the agency to his student for employment.

In contrast, Prof Andrew Odlyzko of the University of Minnesota, does still recommend the NSA to his students. Having misgivings, and urging some reforms, he sees the agency as important for protecting US interests and global information systems. A major line of his argument is that it is inevitable that privacy is being eroded, and hence it is better that the NSA be ahead of others.

Despite his guarded support to the NSA, Odlyzko raises some of the more critical opinions:

"My carefully considered view is that our society has become preoccupied with terrorism to an absurd and harmful degree. That is what has driven the intelligence agencies to the extreme measures they have taken."

"The moves taken in the name of fighting terrorism, including the intrusive NSA data collection that has recently come to light and more generally the militarization of our society, are not justified by the dangers we currently face from terrorism. In fact, these moves will likely inhibit our ability to deal with many of the other threats and probably will even inhibit the antiterrorism campaign."

As Western politicians use IS extremism as the latest excuse for another round of drastic reductions to our liberties and increased powers to intelligence agencies, it is worth considering these thoughtful critiques of accepting politicians’ knee-jerk and unbalanced measures.

Venezia sunset (companion to Venezia by moonlight)

Venezia sunset (companion to Venezia by moonlight)

A Penrose Tile set I made

I do love our local Art Gallery of South Australia.

These are two works in the collection by British artist, J W Waterhouse (1849-1917). The first is Circe, (1892), and the bottom one is The Favourites of the Emperor Honorius (1883).

qagoma:

[Throw Back Thursday] We travel back to c.1910 to the ‘The Mystic Wood’, an unfinished work by JW Waterhouse (England 1894-1917), it captures much of what was typical of his style & choice of subject – drawn from the classical myths of Homer & Ovid, & the literary & poetical works of Shakespeare, Shelly, Keats & Alfred, Lord Tennyson /  The inspiration for this work is not known, however we’d like to hear your thoughts

Weirdly someone mentioned that Waterhouse was one of their recent favourite artists … and then this floats past my dash.
BTW - he did not die at the age of 23. His dates are actually 1849-1917.

qagoma:

[Throw Back Thursday] We travel back to c.1910 to the ‘The Mystic Wood’, an unfinished work by JW Waterhouse (England 1894-1917), it captures much of what was typical of his style & choice of subject – drawn from the classical myths of Homer & Ovid, & the literary & poetical works of Shakespeare, Shelly, Keats & Alfred, Lord Tennyson /  The inspiration for this work is not known, however we’d like to hear your thoughts

Weirdly someone mentioned that Waterhouse was one of their recent favourite artists … and then this floats past my dash.

BTW - he did not die at the age of 23. His dates are actually 1849-1917.

Duomo Cathedral doorknobs, Florence.

I wonder what they say to each other?

lostinfictionbooks:

Book and tea

I just finished reading this, and it was great!
I starts as light as Artemis Fowl, but before long it was more like One Flew over Cuckoo’s Nest. Or something. You should read it.

lostinfictionbooks:

Book and tea

I just finished reading this, and it was great!

I starts as light as Artemis Fowl, but before long it was more like One Flew over Cuckoo’s Nest. Or something. You should read it.